I did a poll to see what people wanted more information on.

I will address a few of dental treatment options that have a similar process.

Veneers

What are they?

It can be used to make misaligned/gapped teeth look straight (as an alternative to orthodontic treatment), mask internal stains (like from medications), repair fractures/chips, and enhance the smile.

Cost

A treatment done by a dentist (not everyone is a candidate for this procedure); costs are dependent on many factors which you would need to discuss with your dentist.

The Process

A layer of tooth structure is removed around the tooth to allow the restorative material to attach.

Material

It can be made from porcelain (custom and made in a lab) or a composite (built up like a filling) material.

What can I expect?

A local anesthetic is required, the appointment may take a while, or with the porcelain, it may be two separate sessions so that the lab can complete the custom work.

They are not a one time fix or will last forever; you need to be prepared to take care of this restoration (just like oil changes on a car). Regular checks and oral hygiene is essential to maintain the restoration and to catch a minor problem early if it occurs.

Crowns

What are they?

It may be needed if you have had a root canal treatment, a fracture, an enhanced smile, or an extensive filling that is getting questionable.

You may have heard it referred to as a “cap.” Similar to the veneer (discussion with a dentist or a specialist for eligibility and costs is required).

It can be all porcelain, stainless steel, gold, or porcelain fused to metal.

What can I expect?

Similar to the veneer, local anesthetic is used, a layer around the surface of the tooth is removed (this is called the prep), an impression is taken (it can be made in house or sent to the lab), the appointment may take a while, or you may need to return for a second appointment when the lab is done building it.

If you are having the lab kind built, then you will also have a temporary crown placed for the interim (it’ll be like a plastic); it won’t be as durable, so you will need to be cautious.

The dentist completes the procedure by securing the crown with a material similar to glue.

Like I had mentioned with the veneers, they are not a one time fix or will last forever; you need to be prepared to take care of this restoration (just like oil changes on a car). Regular checks and oral hygiene is essential to maintain the restoration and to catch a minor problem early if it occurs.

Bridges

What are they?

It replaces a missing tooth by connecting two or more teeth that are separated by an space where a tooth/teeth used to be (there are other types, but I’ll keep it simple). It is like two crowns that are connected by a fake tooth, all fused; usually, it is porcelain.

Similar to the veneer and crowns (discussion with a dentist or a specialist for eligibility and costs is required).

What can I expect?

A local anesthetic is used, a layer of tooth structure is removed on all the teeth that are involved, impressions are taken and sent to the lab, a temporary bridge is placed for the interim, and when the lab is done (usually two weeks), the dentist will place the completed bridge; it is secured with a material similar to glue.

Like I had mentioned with the veneers and crowns, they are not a one time fix or will last forever; you need to be prepared to take care of this restoration (just like oil changes on a car). Regular checks and oral hygiene is essential to maintain the restoration and to catch a minor problem early if it occurs.

In Summary

To summarize, these procedures have the benefit of improving your smile and perhaps making you feel more confident.

It may reduce the chances of a tooth fracturing, which is a more stable dentition. They also may improve the function of your mouth, chewing; you may also experience less discomfort in your jaw joint or facial region because you can chew equally or more balanced.

Some risks are that you lose tooth structure during the prep procedure, sensitivity, pressure or discomfort, or the restoration may fail, which may lead to tooth loss.

In the end, it comes down to the conversation between you and your dental provider, then consider your personal beliefs and needs.

If you have questions concerns or suggestions for future topics, please email, admin@totherootdh.ca

I took the images from the CDA website, and I’ve linked them or copied the link if needed.